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Maryland Recycling Act (MRA) Definitions

                                                            MRA = Maryland Recycling Act
 
In 1988, the Maryland Recycling Act (MRA) authorized the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to reduce the disposal of solid waste in Maryland through management, education and regulation. The Maryland Recycling Act (MRA) requires that each of Maryland's jurisdictions develop and implement recycling programs & report the amount and types of materials recycled annually.
 
In the 2012 legislative session, the Maryland general Assembly passed House Bill (HB) 929: Environment -- Recycling Rates and Waste Diversion -- Statewide Goals, Chapter 692, Acts of 2012 (the "law").  The law takes effect on October 1, 2012, and requires full implementation of the county's revised recycling law by December 31, 2015.  The law also requires the county to revise it's recycling plan by July 1, 2012.  The plan must include a provision that provides for a reduction through recycling of at least 35% for a county with a population greater than 150,000 or 20% for a county with a population less than 150,000, of the County's solid waste stream by weight, or submits adequate justification. including economic and other specific factors, as to why the reduction cannot be met.
 

Maryland Recycling Act Definitions:

Aluminum: Aluminum recovered from water treatment plants DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Scrap Metal” section.

Aluminum Foil and Food Tray Containers: Aluminum foil and aluminum food tray containers count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category.

Animal Bedding: See “Stall Waste.”

Animal Carcasses: The recycling of animal carcasses counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category for non-composted recycling or the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category for composted recycling.

Animal Organs (Offal): Animal organs, tissues, or blood that are the waste products from an animals primary purpose that are recycled and marketed into a material not related to the animals primary purpose (e.g., an animal slaughtered for human consumption with the byproducts used as a research tool, medical training, composted, etc.) counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category for non-composted recycling or the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category for composted recycling. Similarly, a research animal that has its organs recycled as pet food counts towards the recycling rate counts toward the MRA rate. However, organs processed into pet food from an animal that was raised as food stock DOES NOT count as recycling.

Animal Protein/Fats (liquid): Liquid animal fats DO NOT count towards the MRA rate.

Animal Protein/Fats (solid): In order for a material to be classified as an animal solid
protein/fat and reported, the material must pass the Paint Filter Liquids Test (Method
9095B) as detailed by the EPA. Also, the material cannot be converted to biofuel. Details of the
test are available at www.epa.gov/osw/hazard/testmethods/sw846/pdfs/9095b.pdf.

Animal Renderings: Animal waste tissue or solid fat that has been converted or melted down
by heating. Renderings not converted to biofuel count toward the MRA recycling rate and
should be included in the “Animal Protein/Solid Fat” section of the “Other Materials” category.

Back-End Scrap Metal: Ferrous and non-ferrous metal pulled post incineration. Back-end
scrap counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Back-End Scrap” section of
the “Metals” category. 

Ballasts: Light ballasts DO NOT count towards the MRA rate. If the ballasts are recycled (not
simply being diverted from the waste stream) they should be included in the “Other” section.

Bakery Waste: Bakery waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See
“Compost/Mulch” for further details. If the bakery waste is sold to an animal feed producer it
counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other
Materials” category.

Bark: Scrap bark from a manufacturing process that is composted or mulched counts towards
the MRA rate and should be included in the “Wood Materials” section of the “Compost/Mulch”
category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. Scrap bark that is manufactured
into a new product (e.g., charcoal) counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the
“Other” section of the “Other Materials” category.

Batteries (household type): Household type (e.g., AA, D, rechargeable, etc.) batteries that are
recycled (not just properly disposed) count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the
“Other” section of the “Metals” category.

Biofuel: See “Fuel.”

Biomass: Biomass DOES NOT constitute recycling. The resultant ash may be counted toward
the MRA recycling rate provided the ash is recycled and meets the definition of MSW-to-Energy
Ash and should be included in the “MSW-to-Energy Ash” section of the “”Other Materials”
category.

Boats: Boats DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other”
section.

Books: Unsold returned books from bookstores to manufacturer count towards the MRA rate
and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Paper” category.

C&D Debris (Code of Maryland Regulations 26.04.07.13): Construction and Demolition
Debris. Construction debris is structural building material including cement, concrete, bricks
(excluding refractory type), lumber, plaster and plasterboard, insulation, shingles, floor, wall and
ceiling tile, pipes, glass, wires, carpet, wallpaper, roofing, felt, or other structural fabrics.
Demolition debris is debris associated with the razing of buildings, roads, bridges, and other
structures includes structural steel, concrete, bricks (excluding refractory type), lumber, plaster
and plasterboard, insulation, cement, shingles and roofing material, floor and wall tile, asphalt,
pipes, wires, and other items physically attached to the structure, including appliances if they
have been or will be compacted to their smallest practical volume.

Canes: Wooden canes that are composted or mulched count towards the MRA rate and should
be included in the “Wood Materials” section of the “Compost/Mulch” category. See
“Compost/Mulch” for further details. Metal canes that are recycled count towards the MRA rate
and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. Refurbished
and reused canes DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other”
section.

Carpet Remnants: Carpet remnants returned to the manufacturer to be used in the
manufacturing process count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Textiles”
section of the “Other Materials” category.

Catalogues: Unsold catalogues picked up by the distributor and recycled count towards the
MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Paper” category.

Chicken Manure: Chicken manure that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should
be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See
“Compost/Mulch” for further details.

Christmas Trees: Christmas trees that are composted or mulched count towards the MRA rate
and should be included in the “Brush and Branches” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Yard)”
category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. Christmas trees used as sediment control devises (approved and documented by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources) count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. Christmas trees that are incinerated DO NOT count towards the MRA rate. However, the
resultant ash may be counted toward the MRA recycling rate, and should be included in the
“Other” section of the “Other Materials” category, provided the ash is recycled into a new product (e.g., fertilizer, aggregate, etc.).

Cloth: Cloth material processed into rags, etc., (not reused as clothing without processing)
counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Textiles” section of the “Other
Materials” category.

Commingled Containers: Containers of different materials collected together (i.e.,
plastic/glass/metal or plastic/metal or glass/metal or plastic/glass).

Compost/Mulch: Only thoroughly composted/mulched material that is marketed (not landfilled), or authorized for use by MDE as a substitute for cover material in the landfill, or used as sediment control devises (approved and documented by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources) may be counted. Compost or mulch that is burned as fuel is not considered marketed and DOES NOT count as a recyclable material. However, resultant ash from the burning of compost or mulch counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “MSW-to-Energy Ash” section of the “Other Materials category, provided the ash meets the definition of MSW-to-Energy Ash. IMPORTANT: Simply using a compostable/mulchable material for a specific purpose (e.g., spreading stall waste on a field) DOES NOT constitute a “thoroughly composted/mulch material” and DOES NOT count towards the MRA and should be included in the “Other” section.

Compost/Mulch (Yard): Includes mixed yard waste and materials generated from  landscaping activities. Landclearing debris DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Landclearing Debris” section. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details.

Compost/Mulch (Other): Includes materials such as food waste, wood materials, and other organics composted but not classified as “Compost/Mulch (Yard)”. See also “Compost/Mulch” and definitions of specific materials for further details.

Construction & Demolition Debris: See “C&D Debris.”

Cooking Grease: In order for cooking grease to count as a MRA Recyclable and be reported, the material must pass the Paint Filter Liquids Test (Method 9095B) as detailed by the EPA. Also, the material cannot be converted to biofuel. Details of the test are available at www.epa.gov/osw/hazard/testmethods/sw846/pdfs/9095b.pdf.

Corn Ensilage (silage): Corn silage that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should
be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See Compost/Mulch” for further details. If the corn silage is sold to an animal feed producer it counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other
Materials” category.

Crutches: Wooden crutches that are composted or mulched count towards the MRA rate and
should be included in the “Wood Materials” section of the “Compost/Mulch” category. See Compost/Mulch” for further details. Metal crutches that are recycled count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. Refurbished and reused crutches DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section.

Electronic Waste: Recycled or refurbished electronic waste counts towards the MRA rate and
should be included in the “Electronics” section of the “Other Materials” category. IMPORTANT: Jurisdictions reporting electronics recycling should follow-up with their contractor and verify that the electronic waste is actually being recycled by the processor

Fly Ash: Fly ash from public utilities DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Coal Ash” section.

Food Waste: Food waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. Food converted to Biomass DOES NOT constitute recycling. The resultant ash may be counted
toward the MRA recycling rate provided the ash is recycled and meets the definition of MSW-to-
Energy Ash and should be included in the “MSW-to-Energy Ash” section of the “”Other
Materials” category.

Foundry Waste: Foundry waste used in asphalt counts towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category.

Freon: Freon DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other”
section.

Front-End Scrap Metal: Ferrous or non-ferrous materials pulled from the waste stream in a refuse disposal system. Front-end scrap counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. See also “Back-End Scrap Metal”, “Metal (MRA)”, and “Scrap Metal (Material)”.

Fuel: Material converted to any type of fuel DOES NOT constitute recycling and should not be reported.

Glass (Appliance, Drinking, Furniture, Industrial Process): Glass from appliances, drinking containers, furniture, or pre-consumer from industrial processes counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Glass” category.

Glass (C&D, Transportation): Glass from transportation equipment (e.g., cars, etc.) and from C&D activities (e.g., windows, etc.) DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section. 

Goodwill Clothing Items: Clothing items that are not sold and are subsequently sold to a rag dealer count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Textiles” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Grain Waste: Grain waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. If the grain waste is sold to an animal feed producer it counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category in Table B1.
Hatchery Waste: Hatchery waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be
included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. If the hatchery waste is processed into a protein supplement it counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Hospital Appliance: Hospital appliances include canes, crutches, oxygen tank carts, walkers, wheelchairs, etc. If recycled hospital appliances count towards the MRA rate and should be included.. See the definition of a hospital appliance material for specific information.

Hospital Waste: See “Infectious Waste.”

Household Hazardous Waste (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-1801): Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) is any waste material, including garbage or trash, derived from a household that would be listed as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act but for the fact that the waste is derived from a household. Household hazardous waste may include:

· Agricultural chemicals;
· Cleaning agents and solvents;
· Paint;
· Pesticides; and
· Preservatives.

HHW is a MRA waste. HHW that is recycled (i.e., processing HHW components into new products) counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. IMPORTANT: Simply diverting HHW from the waste stream DOES NOT constitute recycling. Note: For the MRA Tonnage Report, Antifreeze and Oil DO NOT count towards the MRA rate should be included.

Industrial Fluids: Industrial fluids (non-HHW) that are recycled DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section.

Infectious Waste (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-227): Any waste that comes from a hospital, laboratory, or other health care facility as defined in § 19-114 of the Health-General Article and that is known or suspected to be contaminated with organisms capable of producing disease or infection in humans. “Infectious waste” includes: 

· Contaminated disposable equipment, instruments, and utensils;
· Contaminated needles, scalpels, and razor blades;
· Human tissues and organs that result from surgery, obstetrics, or autopsy;
· Feces, urine, vomitus, and suctionings;
· Live vaccines for human use;
· Blood and blood products; and
· Laboratory specimens, such as tissues, blood elements, excreta, and secretions.

The burning of infectious waste DOES NOT count as recycling and should ONLY be reported as
Non-MRA waste.

Insulators: Insulators used in the electric grid DO NOT count toward the MRA and should be
included in the “Other” section.

Landclearing Debris (Code of Maryland Regulations 26.04.07.11): “Earthen material such as clays, sands, gravels, and silts, topsoil, tree stumps, root mats, brush and branches, logs, vegetation, and rock” from land clearing operations that if not recycled are discarded in landclearing debris, rubble, or C&D landfills.

Landscaping Debris: Grass, leaves, brush and branches, and mixed yard waste generated from
landscaping (Webster’s II – New Riverside University Dictionary, 1984. def., to adorn or improve a section of ground) operations. 

Leaves: In addition to compost/mulched leaves, non-decomposed or mulch leaf mixture may count (when used as a soil amendment) towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Leaves” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Yard)” category. The tonnage of material incorporated into the soil may be counted as long as the activities have been approved by the Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Litho-plates: Litho-plates used in x-ray machines count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. 

Livestock: See “Animal Carcasses.”

Manure: See “Stall Waste”.

Mattresses: Mattresses that are processed and remanufactured count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Textiles” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Mercury: Mercury that is recycled counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. IMPORTANT: Simply diverting mercury from the waste stream DOES NOT constitute recycling.

Metal (MRA): Acceptable MRA metals are limited to specific types of material, other than scrap material, that would ordinarily be disposed in a refuse disposal system. Only the following metals count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Metals” category:

1. Aluminum beverage and food containers;
2. Aluminum foil and food tray containers;
3. Bi-metal, tin, and steel food or beverage containers;
4. White goods (e.g., refrigerators, stoves, washing machines, air conditioners, etc.);
5. Lead Acid Batteries (e.g., automobile batteries)
6. Ferrous or non-ferrous materials pulled from the waste stream at a municipal solid
waste disposal facility via front-end recycling;
7. Ferrous and non-ferrous metal pulled post incineration; and
8. Any other metals deemed acceptable by the Department.
See also “Back-End Scrap Metal”, “Front-End Scrap Metal”, and “Scrap Metal (Material)”.
Mercury: Recycled mercury counts toward the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other”
section of the “Metals” category.

Mixed Yard Waste (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-1701(s)(1)(2)): “Organic plant waste derived from gardening, landscaping, and tree trimming activities. Yard Waste includes leaves, garden waste, lawn cuttings, weeds, and pruning material” that is composted or mulched and marketed.

Motor Oil: Motor oil that is recycled DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Motor Oil” section. 

Motor Oil Filters: Used motor oil filters count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category . 

MRA Recyclables: Materials that meet the definition of “Recyclable Material” AND are not excluded under the definition of the “MRA Waste” from being an MRA material. 

MRA Waste: See “Solid Waste Stream.”

MSW Compost: Composting of non-source-separated MSW materials. IMPORTANT: Since incoming tonnage consists of non-source-separated waste, it must be reported as “MRA Waste”. Only the portion of the outgoing tonnage of compost that is marketed counts toward the MRA recycling rate. MSW compost excludes separately collected landscaping materials that are included in the “Compost/Mulch (Yard)” category.

MSW-to-Energy Ash: Ash recycled by converting into aggregate, incorporating into cement blocks, etc., counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “MSW-to-Energy Ash” section of the “Other Materials” category. IMPORTANT: Ash used as an alternate daily cover at a landfill does not constitute recycling. Since incoming tonnage consists of nonsource-separated waste, it must be reported as “MRA Waste”. Only the MSW ash recycled is reported. 
Oxygen/Propane Tanks: Oxygen/Propane Tanks DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and
should be included in the “Scrap Metal” section. 

Oxygen Tank Carts: Metal oxygen tank carts that are recycled count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. Refurbished and reused carts DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section.

Oyster/Clam Shells: Oyster and clam shells that are composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. If the oyster and clam shells are recycled into another product, it counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category.

Paper Waste: Paper waste from print shops that is recycled off-site counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Paper” category.

Paint: Recycled paint counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category.

PCB Light Ballasts: See “Ballasts.”

Porcelain Insulators: See “Insulators.”

Pozzolan (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 15-407): “The finely divided residue which results from combustion of ground or powdered coal and is released by combustion gasses, as defined by the test methods published by the American Society for Testing Methods.” Pozzolan DOES NOT count toward the MRA rate and should be included in the “Coal Ash” section.

Propane Tanks: See “Oxygen Tanks”.

Recyclable Materials (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-1701(l)): Those materials that would otherwise become solid waste for disposal in a refuse disposal system and may be collected, separated, or processed and returned to the market-place in the form of raw materials or products. SEE “MRA Recyclables”, also. 

Renderings: See “Animal Renderings.”

Resource Recovery Facility (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-1701(o)): A facility in existence as of January 1, 1988 that:

1. Processes solid waste to produce valuable resources, including steam, electricity, metals, or refuse-derived fuel; and

2. Achieves a volume reduction of at least 50 percent of its solid waste stream.

Roofing Shingles: Roofing Shingles from the manufacturing process can be counted towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. Roofing shingles from a construction job DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “C&D Debris” section.

Rubble: Wastes acceptable for disposal in a permitted rubble landfill or cell including:  demolition debris, construction debris, asbestos, and landclearing debris. Rubble DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “C&D” section.

Sawdust: Sawdust from an industrial process that is composted/mulched counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. Sawdust used as animal bedding counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Scrap Metal (Material): "Home scrap" and any scrap metal or other scrap materials that are not normally disposed of at a refuse disposal site. Scrap material includes scrap metal that has historically been processed through a scrap yard for recycling such as automobiles, plumbing materials, etc. Scrap material does not include:

1. Aluminum beverage and food containers;
2. Aluminum foil and food tray containers;
3. Bi-metal, tin, and steel food or beverage containers;
4. White goods (e.g., refrigerators, stoves, washing machines, air conditioners, etc.);
5. Lead Acid Batteries (e.g., automobile batteries)
6. Ferrous or non-ferrous materials pulled from the waste stream at a municipal solid
waste disposal facility via front-end recycling;
7. Ferrous and non-ferrous metal pulled post incineration; and
8. Any other metals deemed acceptable by the Department.

Scrap metal DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Scrap Metal” section. See also “Back-End Scrap Metal”, “Front-End Scrap Metal”, and “Metal (MRA)”.

Sewage Sludge (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-201(l)): Any thickened liquid, suspension, settled solid, or dried residue that a sewage treatment plant extracts from sewage.

Silver Sludge: Silver sludge that is recycled counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. 

Slag: Slag from the steel manufacturing process counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Solid Waste Stream (Annotated Code of Maryland, Environment Article § 9-1701(p)): Garbage or refuse that would, unless recycled, be disposed of in a refuse disposal system located in this State. “Solid Waste Stream” does not include hospital waste, rubble, scrap material, landclearing debris, sewage sludge, and waste generated by a single individual or business and disposed of in a facility dedicated solely for that entity’s waste.

Solvents: See “Industrial Fluids.”

Stall Waste: Animal stall waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details.

Textiles: Textile material processed into other materials counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Textiles” section of the “Other Materials” category. IMPORTANT: Donated or reused textiles DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section. 

Tires: Recycled tires, retread tires, and tires burned in cement kilns (12% of the total weight of tires used in cement kilns) count towards the MRA rate and should be included in their corresponding section of the “Other Materials” category. Tires authorized for use by a State as Alternate Daily Cover (ADC) count towards the MRA rate and should be included in “Tires “Recycled)” section of the “Other Materials” category. IMPORTANT: In order for tires used as ADC to count, a County MUST obtain and maintain documentation, from the State that indicates the State allows tires to be used as ADC, as proof. Maryland DOES NOT authorize tires for use as ADC. Tires burned for fuel DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section.

Toner Cartridges: Recycled toner cartridges count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Other Materials” category. 

Utility Poles: Utility poles (wood) that are recycled DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section. Utility poles (metal) that are recycled DO NOT count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Scrap Metal” section.

Vegetable Oil: Vegetable oil DOES NOT count towards the MRA rate. It should be included in the “Other” section . 

Vegetable Waste: Vegetable waste that is composted counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Food Waste” section of the “Compost/Mulch (Other)” category.See “Compost/Mulch” for further details. Vegetable waste from a processor sent to a farmer as a substitute for other feed counts towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other ”section of the “Other Materials” category.

Waste Oil: See “Motor Oil”.

Walkers: Metal walkers that are recycled count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. Refurbished and reused walkers DO NOT constitute recycling and should not be reported. 

Wheelchairs: Metal wheelchairs that are recycled count towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Metals” category. Refurbished and reused wheelchairs DO NOT constitute recycling and should not be reported.

White Goods: White goods include refrigerators, stoves, washing machines, dryers, water heaters, and air conditioners.

Wood Materials: Wood products, pallets, crates, barrels, and wood found in furniture that are not part of an industrial process that are composted or mulched and marketed.

Wood Shavings: Wood shavings from an industrial process that are composted/mulched count
towards the MRA rate and should be included in the “Other” section of the “Compost/Mulch
(Other)” category. See “Compost/Mulch” for further details.